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Crayoned and Dyed Egg series – number three
Apr 16th, 2014 by Craftylocks

 

Chalk has a special use in this art craft for children.

This technique is a very good way to turn some simple lines, drawing or even writing, into a piece of art.

Use some coloured chalk to draw some lines, make them reasonably thick. You want to have a picture that has shapes to colour in.

Use wax crayons to colour between the lines. Do not colour over the lines, although a little bit does not matter, but in general leave the chalk lines visible. Although you cannot see at this stage, I also coloured around my egg shape with white crayon.

Then use dye, food colouring or watery paint to paint over the whole picture.

The wax crayons will resist the dye, but the chalk will not! Everywhere that is chalk or plain paper will soak up the dye and change how it looks in a very cool way!

More fun with crayon and dyes for Easter at Crayoned and Dyed Egg number one and number two and now number four.

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Crayoned and Dyed Egg Series – number two
Apr 13th, 2014 by Craftylocks

 

This crayon and dye technique is one of my favourite! It is like an invisible drawing that magically appears.

It is a very simple process, you just draw a picture with white crayon on white paper, and then paint dye or food colouring or very watery paint over the top. The wax in the crayon resists the watery colour and shows through. If course drawing a picture in white crayon is a bit tricky as you cannot really see what you are drawing – but I think this is part of the fun! It is best to not try to draw anything specific – a pattern like this example works really well.

The invisible white crayon on white paper picture.

Then the dye is painted over top and the picture appears!




Also make sure you see Crayoned and Dyed Egg number one, number three and number four as well!

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Crayoned and Dyed Egg series – number one.
Apr 6th, 2014 by Craftylocks

I had the crayons and dye out to work on something for the next newsletter and was having so much fun that I thought I would do a lovely colourful Easter egg as well. I just planed to do one, but I kept thinking of different ways to do them that I made a few. I will post the others over the next few weeks.

Dye is something that is a standard in the art supplies for New Zealand schools and I love it as a way to add a fantastic pop of colour and lift to a picture. It can be substituted with food colouring and watered down paint. It is effectively a ‘colour wash’ and one of the properties that I love is that wax crayons resist it and will show through when dye is painted over the top of the crayons.

So a simple and effective Easter egg is to draw and colour in an egg with crayons. I did random criss cross patterns on an egg shape and then coloured the shapes in with lots of different colours.

Then I painted the dye over the whole piece of paper and you can see how effective this is with the crayoned picture!

Now proudly put this on the wall or make a gorgeous Easter card with it! You could make a series of cards by also trying out Crayoned and Dyed Egg series number two, number three and number four.

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Rotated Shape Patterns
Jun 13th, 2013 by Craftylocks

You start with a simple shape, make a few cuts, and add in some rotations to create a bit of exciting art.

Start with a sqaure piece of paper. Draw a shape or pattern and color it in. We have used watercolor pencils to create our colorful shapes.
Cut the shape into four equal sections, rotate each section, and when you are happy with the look, glue them down.
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Cut Up Shapes Picture
Apr 22nd, 2013 by Craftylocks

Colorful and easy – it also suits a wide range of ages!

Roughly chop up some bits of colored paper. Glue some onto a piece of black paper.
Arrange another layer on top of them, overlapping them but letting bits of the first layer show.
Repeat with another layer.
Stop when you are happy with the shapes and colors, or if it is bedtime – whichever comes first.
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Apple Print Tree
Mar 13th, 2013 by Craftylocks

 

In this part of the world we are heading into Autumn (Fall) and our many many apple trees are laden! I go and pick buckets full of apples and it does not even look like I have been near the trees! So I have been making fruit leather, stewed apple, apple puddings and now apple art.

I hope you remember this craft when it is apple season in your part of the world, or if you cannot wait – you can probably buy apples all year round anyway – they might even be a New Zealand apple.

This craft would be great as a family or class craft. Start with everyone using hand prints to create the leaves of the tree. If there are lots of children involved, a little crowd control of having only a few children with painted hands at a time, will help minimize the mess. To make the hand print you can either press the hand onto some thinly spread paint, or paint soaked into a sponge, or you can use a brush to paint the hand.

While the hand print leaves are drying, cut an apple in half and press a fork into the round part to use as a handle.

Dry the cut side and press it onto the paint, or use a brush to paint it onto the cut surface of the apple. Then press it onto the hand print tree. It works best if you ‘re-load’ the paint onto the apple each time you make a print.

But the print-making does not need to end here! Using a different shade of green paint, make a leaf at the top of each apple with a finger print. For a classroom tree you could instead cut the leaves out of paper and write a childs name on each one and then glue them onto the apples. You could glue them just at the base of the leaf and curl the leaf out a little bit to make them stand out a bit more.

I did think that we could have done the tree trunk with foot prints – but by this stage the paint was starting to spread far and wide so I took the easy way out and just painted it.

We just loved the pattern the apple prints made so we did other apple print crafts as well. Have a look at our beautiful apple print paper.

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