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Layered Paper Flower
Feb 24th, 2013 by Craftylocks

I just found this craft from one of my very first paper crafts for children newsletters in 2010! I do slowly add the crafts from old newsletters to the site but I had missed this one.

It almost feels like 2010 since I last sent out one of my newsletters. Well it has not been quite that long, but it has been far longer than I would like – sorry to anyone who has been waiting for one. The good news is that I am again getting time to craft and am bursting with ideas. The crafts for the next newsletter are done, the photos are taken, now I just need to write it – so not much longer to go now.

The great thing about this craft is that you can keep it really simple or add little details and mimic real flowers. This technique is very similar to the Tissue Paper Flowers on the web site and is easy to follow. We did the tissue version for my daughters crafty birthday party and the children learnt how to make them in less than a minute! One safety note, pipe cleaners do have sharp points.

You will need:

- paper – decorated or colored

- pipe cleaners (chenille sticks)

- scissors

Cut flower shapes out of the paper, they do not have to be perfect as by the time they are layered up you will not see all the little details. The paper we used is made with the pulled apart paint technique from your introduction email. Roll one end of the pipe cleaner over. Starting with the smallest shapes first, thread the paper shapes onto the sharp end of the pipe cleaner and push them up around the rolled end. If your paper is thick you may need to pierce holes in the center – otherwise you can make a hole with the sharp end of the pipe cleaner. Once you have enough on, shape the ‘petals’ by bending them up until you are happy with it.

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Gridded Pattern Name
Oct 26th, 2012 by Craftylocks

I really like this technique – it gives a cool result even if you have no artistic or creative skills!

To make the pattern, draw up a grid on the paper. Then write the word on top, and rub out the grid lines that are inside the word shapes. You can also do it the other way round and write the word first, then do the grid lines. Color in the shapes using two different colors, alternating them as shown.

We did something similar for a Mosaic Fathers Day Card idea

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Collage Name
Oct 14th, 2012 by Craftylocks

It is not just an educational activity, it is fun too! Finding, cutting, assembling and gluing – lots of paper crafty fun for young children who are learning how to spell their name.

Gather together some advertising brochures, and some magazines that you do not mind sacrificing to craft – and hunt out some letters. Try and find a selection of letters and then pick out the best ones to make the name. Glue them onto some bright colored paper and use another color for a border.
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Decorating Dinosaur Shapes
Sep 6th, 2012 by Craftylocks

Giving children a craft activity to do that is half started makes it a lot easier and a lot more fun as they are into the exciting process straight away – the part where you get to play with glue and sparkly stuff!

Draw your own dinosaur shape or use one of the templates (Dino 1, Dino 2, Dino 3) to get you started.
Copy the shape onto some colored card and cut the shape out. Hand it over to a child to add lots of embellishments. And remember, for all we know dinosaurs might have had jewel encrusted sides.
Display and enjoy!!
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Cardboard and Tape Writing Compendium
Sep 1st, 2012 by Craftylocks

Not much in the way of step by step photos for this craft – we made it about 20 years ago as a gift when we had far more ideas than money. It is a great idea for children to make as a gift as well.

You need cardboard and some masking tape. I like to use masking tape as you can paint over the top of it very easily. So you need either one large piece of card you fold or two larger pieces of card – these will form the basic shape and size of the compendium, so they need to be larger than the paper you will have in your compendium. You will need two smaller pieces of card – the same height of the large card, but narrower to make the pockets for the paper and envelopes to sit in.

If you are using a larger piece of card to fold, score it on the fold line before you fold it to make a tidy fold. Tape everything together with the masking tape. Then start decorating! We painted over the masking tape to make it look pretty and painted a picture on the cover that matched the decorated paper and envelopes we had made.

An easy and fun way to make decorated paper and envelopes for the writing paper in the compendium is printmaking with potatoes.

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Basic Paper Lantern
Aug 20th, 2012 by Craftylocks

There are some crafts that were such a part of my childhood making stuff, that they are often overlooked in the search for that cool craft to create with our children. And of course, just because I think it was a common craft, it does not mean that everyone knows how to do it!

So just in case you have forgotten about this one, or if you have never done – it is paper lantern time!

All you need is some colored or patterned paper, some scissors and glue.

These lanterns can be made any size so just use what paper you have. This lantern uses scrapbook paper, but you could use paper decorated in a previous crafty, arty session.

Fold your sheet of paper in half. It doesn’t matter if you fold length-ways or width-ways as your lantern will still work but it will affect the shape.

Make a fold a couple of finger widths down from the unfolded edge on both sides. Unfold. This is the line you cut up to.

Cut through the folded edge up to the fold-line. Make each cut about the same width.

Open out and keeping the narrow strip that is not cut at the top and bottom, make it into a tube and glue in place.

Use another strip of paper to make a hanging loop and glue in place on each side of the top.

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